ARCHIVE
2020 edition
Bassin Saint-Félix
Pas encore mon histoire
VINCENT OLINET

By absorbing different styles, from Mannerism to Romanticism, Olinet creates exuberant, Baroque objects – ones that are half-finished and decadent, yet refined, where classical canons of beauty are decidedly not respected. What results is an impression of subterfuge and the subversion of good taste that leads to the cheerful and knowing fascination in anyone who lays eyes upon it.

In the Temple du Goût (18th century), Olinet continues his sculptural exploration by transforming the space into a seemingly domestic décor with an air of decadence and… gluttony. Chandeliers with clumsy and coarse mouldings, wainscoting made of overlapping slices of bread and flashy colours, brooms with manes of hair, each with fluorescent highlights, all come together in a sophisticated and phantasmagorical mix undermining a style known as “Nantes Baroque” – a local variation of Rococo.

While one could easily trace the lineage of his work to 17th century Flemish still lifes, spectators will instead experience these pieces as encounters with exuberant, Baroque objects – ones that are half-finished and decadent, yet refined, where classical canons of beauty are decidedly not respected. What results is an impression of subterfuge and the subversion of good taste that leads to the cheerful and knowing fascination in anyone who lays eyes upon it.

In the small marina of Canal Saint-Félix, Vincent Olinet has set up Pas encore mon histoire (“Not my history, yet.”). With its powdery pink columns, gold leafing, cushions, drapery, satins, lace and embroidered beads, this work imitates traditional four-poster beds, recalling the comfort and luxury of a bygone era. And yet, though it seems straight out of a fairy tale, this floating and hallucinated, inaccessible mirage seems to float along the Erdre River, as if long-forgotten…